Next BioShock's setting and time period detailed in new report • Eurogamer.net

Next BioShock’s setting and time period detailed in new report • Eurogamer.net

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To date, the BioShock series has taken players deep beneath the ocean circa the 1960s, high into the clouds in 1912, not to mention a multitude of lighthouses spanning, possibly, all of space and time and everything between. And now, a new report has seemingly revealed where the next entry in the acclaimed FPS saga will be leading us next.

As spotted by VGC, journalist Colin Moriarty relayed fresh details on 2K Games’ next BioShock project, previously confirmed to be in development at new studio Cloud Chamber, as part of his latest Sacred Symbols video.

In the video, Moriarty cites sources claiming Cloud Chamber’s take on BioShock will unfold in a fictional Antarctic city sometime during the 1960s – which Eurogamer also understands to be true from its own sources. This, of course, would make its events approximately concurrent with those of BioShock 1 and 2, which dealt with the downfall of Andrew Ryan’s underwater dystopia of Rapture. Moriarty believes the new BioShock city will be called Borealis and that the game’s narrative will connect to previous series entries.

Let’s Play Bioshock 2 Minerva’s Den – Late To The Party.

Moriarty adds that Cloud Chamber has been given “incredible latitude to get [the new BioShock] right… Apparently the inclination there is that they understand full well that this game will be compared to what [original BioShock creator] Ken Levine does.” And on the subject of Levine – whose last major game release was BioShock Infinite in 2013 – Moriarty claims Take-Two will also be publishing his next project, currently in the works at Ghost Story Games.

Little is officially known about either project just yet, however. Announcing the founding of Ghost Story in 2017, Levine described the studio’s first endeavour as a “new immersive sci-fi game with RPG elements”, while 2K has remained largely tightlipped about BioShock 4 – confirmed to be in development back in 2019 – only revealing its codename, Parkside.

At the time, Parkside was described as still being “several” years away from release, so there may be some way to go before Cloud Chamber and 2K are ready to share more.

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